THE DARKEST DAY BEFORE THE BRIGHTEST DAWN!

So, today is the shortest day of the year, AND the darkest day in 500 years. Feels right doesn't it? But what does that mean? There is a saying: "It is darkest before the dawn." As it was heralded 50 years ago - "This is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius." So, wake up, my friends, smell the coffee, be of good cheer. Starting tomorrow, the days begin having more and more daylight.



YOU CREATE YOUR OWN REALITY, ONE HUNDRED PERCENT, NO EXCEPTIONS!

There it is. I said it. Unvarnished. Straight up. Unequivocal. And just to be clear, I didn't make this up, and I'm not the only one stating this axiom out loud these days.

YOU CREATE YOUR OWN REALITY, ONE HUNDRED PERCENT, NO EXCEPTIONS!

Your finances, your love life, your health, yes, of course, most of you at least buy that you create those things if you're reading this blog. But those are the easy ones. The "one hundred percent" part - that's the challenge. 

The subway running late, the guy sitting next to you sneezing on the subway, the weather when you get off the subway? Yep. All your creations.

The stranger you bump into at the coffee shop who just so happens to tell you about a dream job opportunity, the bank error that credits your account with exactly the amount of money you needed to make your rent, the long lost friend you were just thinking about who calls you up? Yep. All your creations.

Don't believe it? Doesn't matter. Doesn't change anything. It's just the way it is. 

Oh, and why am I posting this today? Because in short order, you will come to know it for yourself. This is happening.

Listen to this channeled conversation on the subject. For a condensed version, start at around the 25-minute mark, and particularly focus in at the 30-minute mark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RavjBfS0XY



STABILIZE YOUR EMOTIONS AND BECOME UNIFIED!

This short passage is from ONENESS, by Rasha, the quintessential book on the run-up to 5D that we're all engaged in right now, consciously or not. It may take a couple of readings to understand what is being said here. 

Check it out:

"The pathways of the emotions you have worked so hard to stabilize are those upon which your consciousness will travel in connecting you with heightened levels of awareness. For it is your emotional foundation that unites all aspects of the consciousness that make up your multidimensional identity. That foundation, once cleared of the ego-based need to respond to provocation, serves as the pathway upon which all aspects of your multidimensional self unite in Oneness, and recognize that common bond as one that is shared with All Creation."

Here's my understanding - 

Human beings have emotions, and that isn't a mistake or a distortion. It is our nature in physical form here on Planet Earth. In fact, according to some sources, Earth is known in our galaxy as the "emotion planet," and it's why so many choose to incarnate here. 

Yet, human beings experience many emotions as unpleasant, especially the three main "negative" emotions: fear, anger and sadness. So, when Oneness says it is our "emotional foundation" that unites all aspects of our identity, does that mean that emotional turmoil and pain are necessary to self-actualization? 

No. Or at least not ultimately.

A significant point made in the above passage is that we become unified by doing the hard work of "stabilizing" our emotions through the clearing of "ego-based" provocations that stir up irrational fear, anger and sadness. You see, the three negative emotions, in their purest form, do have a place in our make-up. But the instances that call for them are rare. 

Fear is meant to be reserved for situations of actual danger, like being shot at or chased by a wild animal, propelling us into instant fight-or-flight mode. An imagined future rejection from a prospective date or job opportunity doesn't meet the criteria of dangerous. 

Anger is a powerful emotion reserved for situations in which you are actually being attacked physically, causing adrenaline to be secreted, which energizes and focuses you on stopping the attack through quick, forceful action. Anger is not meant for moments when your partner is hogging the remote or when you can't find a parking space. 

Sadness, in its healthy form, is what we naturally feel during an actual loss due to some kind of major life change, like death or the end of a relationship, even a graduation. Tears and crying are the ways through which we then cleanse our bodies of the physical emotional residue. But sadness is not an appropriate reaction to gaining a few pounds of body fat or getting a stain on your favorite T-shirt.

So, back to Oneness, stabilizing your emotions through self-work means that you are learning not to be provoked into feeling things because your ego is telling you erroneously that you are in danger, or that you are being attacked, or that you're going through a major loss when you're not. Once you've accomplished that stability, which means you're mostly feeling joy, love and pleasure, and rarely feeling fear, anger and sadness, you will unify yourself as the "multidimensional" being that you truly are.

[For more on being chased by tigers, go HERE!]

HAPPY EASTER!

YOU ARE NOT VULNERABLE WHEN YOU'RE OPEN. YOU'RE VULNERABLE WHEN YOU'RE LITTLE!

I read an blog post a while ago entitled, "The One Quality We Often Mistake For Weakness Can Actually Make You Stronger," which extolls the virtues of being "vulnerable." Citing examples from President Obama to the Dalai Lama, the piece gives examples of the strength that comes from being vulnerable. The post refers to a book, "Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead," by Brene Brown.

While I essentially support what the post and book are trying to say, the language of the authors demonstrates a very common error which I would like to address here.

"I feel too vulnerable when..."

How often I hear individuals begin a sentence like that. Usually, the person in question who is perceiving themselves as "vulnerable" is talking about being "open" in some situation that is revealing of their inner life to another. But this common connection in one's mind between openness and vulnerability is erroneous. 

You are not vulnerable when you're open.

The definition of "vulnerable" in most dictionaries is: "susceptible to physical or emotional harm." Okay. That's pretty straightforward. So, when are we the most susceptible to harm in those ways? Well, in two situations, mainly: 1. when we are without an option for avoiding danger; and 2. when we are truly dependent on another person or persons who may choose to do us harm. And when are we most likely to be in such situations? Well, unless you are literally a hostage in a terrorist takeover, or a prisoner of war or in jail, the most prevalent time human beings are actually vulnerable to harm is - you guessed it - in childhood!

That's right. In childhood, especially early childhood, we are essentially hostages to our parents and caretakers, without options to avoid the slings and arrows of our environment. And we are utterly and completely dependent on those others for our well-being, even for our very existence. Whatever the vicissitudes of our parents' mental and emotional health, or lack thereof, we, as children, cannot protect ourselves or remove ourselves from harm's way. We can't stop adults from hurting us, nor can we trade in one set of adults for another. In other words... we are vulnerable. Truly.

Now, here's where the confusion comes in and how the erroneous connection gets made.

As children, as newly minted human beings, we are naturally open, physically, mentally and emotionally. We feel everything fully when we're first born, and to some degree, we stay that way throughout the very early years of life. However, because of the undeveloped, un-self-actualized aspects of humanity, we are injured by our environment. Our parents and caretakers hurt us. Yet, we cannot stop them, nor can we leave them.

So what do we do? We begin to shut down, distort, and/or disconnect parts of ourselves physically, mentally and emotionally in order not to feel the pain so acutely. We form a character structure, and initially, it actually does seem to mitigate the pain, which seems to validate the conclusion that open is vulnerable, and closed is safe.

See, we can't understand truly when we're little that we're little. We can't really picture that one day, we'll be adults ourselves, and have the choices adults have. In other words, we can't understand that it's being little that makes us vulnerable, not being open that makes us vulnerable. And so, stuck in the confines of our character structures as time passes, we miss the fact that nature provides the solution to the problem of vulnerability in childhood - we grow up!

In adulthood, we can realize that protecting ourselves emotionally with the armor of character defenses is very inefficient and inhibiting, and most importantly, no longer necessary. Wearing that suit of armor doesn't make for the easy enjoyment of a sunny day, let alone for making love. On the other hand, being fully open to our inner lives, which frees up the mind and body, gives us the energy and flexibility to creatively express ourselves, enjoy life and, if need be, avoid situations that would do us harm, which mainly means not engaging with negativity. Thus, in this realization, we can engage in a healing process, in an holistic self-work process, that can dismantle the armor and allow us to be ourselves fully.

So, let go of the false belief that when you love and reveal yourself to another, you are vulnerable. And Brene, forgive me for suggesting a slight change to the title of your book, but "Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be OPEN Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead" would work better for me.

TODAY'S "YOU CREATE YOUR OWN REALITY" QUOTE!

"Any time you experience pain and discomfort, fatigue or depression, it is because you are perceiving something from the victim-perpetrator mentality."
(Wendy Kennedy, channeling the Pleiadians)

YOU CAN CHOOSE HOW TO FEEL NOW, IF...

At the beginning of 2013, in a piece entitled "IT'S 2013. WHICH EARTH ARE YOU ON?", the new rules of 5th Dimensional consciousness as they apply to daily life were outlined. It is useful to go over these rules regularly because even though everyone reading this blog now is in 5D, many are still struggling because they are trying to operate on 3D rules. (You can review the rules HERE.)

Rule number 2 stated:

"Creating your reality and its experiences from your emotions and your ego is obsolete."

Elaborating, I wrote that: "Creating your reality from the vibrations of your Higher Self, supported by and in collaboration with the human and universal collective, is the 5D way of living," and "that means, first of all, that you can get off the emotional rollercoaster ride of 3D."

Okay, sounds good, but what does that mean? And how do we do that?

Well, having taught for so long that "your feelings are your feelings" and all you need do is feel them fully to open the door to emotional health, what I'm about to say might sound contradictory and somewhat counterintuitive. But here it is -

You can now choose how to feel.

That's right. And I'm not talking about controlling or suppressing your feelings. Not at all. However, if you have gained access to your emotions, and to your inner beliefs, thought patterns and memories, through a self-work process that has freed you from your character structure to a great extent, then you can begin "deprogramming" yourself from the habitual ways you've thought about yourself and others, about love, work, about life in general. And since so many of our emotional states are precipitated by thoughts, changing your thought patterns will change how you feel.

Most of our old thought patterns and beliefs, especially the negative ones, have been on an automatic loop since childhood. "I'm not good enough." "I don't deserve for things to go my way." "There isn't enough (love, money, time) for me to get what I need." "If I'm too open (to love, pleasure, creative expression), I will be vulnerable to disappointment and hurt." On and on. These repetitive negative declarations then trigger negative emotions - fear, anger, sadness - which then seem to validate the negative belief. And when most of this is going on subconsciously, it seems as though your emotions just happen to you. You just "get depressed" or "find yourself" in a bad mood, grouchy or irritable for apparently no reason. Or you may even think you have a reason for your negativity - the audition that didn't lead to a booking, the job that didn't lead to prosperity, or the sexual experience that didn't lead to an orgasm.

But the truth is, it's not your actual experiences leading you to the negative emotional states. Experiences inherently are neutral until you define them (Read the wonderful children's book, "That's Good! That's Bad!" by Margey Cuyler, for reference.). It's what you're saying to yourself about the events in question, how you're defining the experiences to yourself that's causing you to feel bad.

But... if you've done the self-work necessary to break through your character structure, especially now, in 5D consciousness, where your Higher Self can come through you most effectively, those negative thoughts are conscious to you and you can literally change them.

How?

First, by acknowledging them as there in your mind consciously, and then, releasing the feelings that they've engendered, preferably through a process that involves expressing emotions with the body;

Second, by not identifying with the negative thoughts, but rather, understanding that they represent the defensive ideas and mental patterns created by the ego, which was created by the child, in childhood, and as such, are not really valid for you an adult;

Third, redefine your experiences and situations in terms that you prefer. So, for example, "I didn't get that part because I'm not good enough," becomes "That role wasn't the best way at this time for me to express myself creatively." Or even simpler, the formerly negative, repetitive statements can be changed into open-ended questions like "I wonder what this will lead to?" "I wonder how this door closing will lead to another one opening?"

Fourth, having done the first three, allowing your Higher Self and your oneness with All That Is to come through you and create your reality in as unfiltered a way as possible (i.e. - without your ego involved.).

When you are free from unconsciousness, you have choices, folks. Always. But the journey to freedom requires determination and intention - first to do whatever it takes to break through your character structure, and then, once that's accomplished, to develop a regimen to shift your patterns of thought so you are no longer keeping yourself in a negative emotional climate.

It's a lot of work, yes, and it's hard, yes, but so is climbing Mount Everest or winning the World Series or learning to play the piano or keeping the Eros going in a relationship. Yet, these experiences are also exhilarating and worth it.

The pay-off is great; the work is hard...

"That's good! That's bad!"

TODAY'S "ONENESS" QUOTE!

"You should be prepared to experience unprecedented results, both in your own experience and in the experience of others for whom you may be facilitating. The dramatic remission of symptoms characteristic of this process is a phenomenon that will defy the scientific laws that govern your concept of what is and is not possible. The so-called “miracles” that may once have prompted reactions of awe and wonderment are occurrences to be expected by those who have journeyed to the outer reaches of the human condition in these times. Do not be tempted to limit what is possible, in terms of spontaneous recovery, on the basis of what you may have been taught. There are no such limits—not in the new world you are helping to birth, simply by being present."

("oneness," by Rasha)

IT WAS THIRTY-SIX YEARS AGO TODAY: DECEMBER 8, 1980!

"It's funny how one insect can damage so much grain."

That is a line from Elton John's song of grief, "Empty Garden," written about the murder of Elton's friend, John Lennon, thirty-six years ago today, December 8.

Seven years ago, on 12/8/09, the pilot script of my TV series, "CITY ROCK," was performed live at the Cherry Lane Theatre, directed by Paul Michael Glaser. John Lennon's death plays prominently in the story of "Frank Cello" and his team of misfit warriors, named after the street teen who died on Frank's watch on the streets of Times Square in 1981. I hadn't consciously realized until the night of the performance last year that I had scheduled it to be on the anniversary of Lennon's death.

I had just finished reading a great new book today about that death and that day, entitled simply "December 8, 1980: The Day John Lennon Died," by Keith Elliot Greenberg. The book dramatically follows the utterly different paths of John Lennon and Mark David Chapman, John's assassin, paths that somehow brought them together on that fateful night 36 years ago to shock the entire world. It is quite gripping to experience the trajectories of these two souls as they arrive to an incredible endpoint in their starkly unique lives, in front of the Dakota that December night.

Just as I can still remember what I was doing, as a fourth grader, on the day John F. Kennedy was killed, and where I was and who I was with on the morning of September 11, 2001, I remember distinctly the details of the night of December 8, 1980.

I was riding a bus home from the evening shift at Covenant House, the then famous shelter for runaway teens in Times Square, when it was still a seedy Mecca for nefarious characters and lost souls from all over the country. I worked there per diem as a social worker, supplementing the income from my full-time day job at another social service agency. On Thanksgiving of that particular year, just 2 weeks before John's murder, I worked the evening shift at the shelter serving a sumptuous dinner to the kids that had been donated to Covenant House by John and Yoko. Each place setting had a card with artwork from John decorating it and a greeting from John, Yoko and Sean Lennon.

On that bus on December 8, around midnight, I was pretty much alone, lost in thought when the bus driver addressed me: "Did you hear what happened?" He asked. I just kind of mumbled, not really wanting to engage him. "They shot Lennon," he said. I thought to myself, "Oh boy, this guy's crazy," because I thought he was talking about Lenin, the communist leader who died almost sixty years earlier. The driver persisted, rocking my world. "Yep. They shot John Lennon."

I could feel the blood drain out of my face.

Impossible.

"They shot John Lennon?!"

What?! Who?! Why?!!?


Interesting, isn't it, that the bus driver used the pronoun "they?" It's not an uncommon usage, but who are "they?" Chapman clearly killed John and acted alone in doing so, but yet, when the driver said "They," it seemed somehow appropriate. On 9/11/01, the person who first told me about the attack also said "They flew planes into the World Trade Center," even though it was not yet known who actually did it.

Who are "they?"

Well, "they" are "us."

As John Lennon himself once wrote:

"I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together."

John at least came to understand something in his short time on Earth about the true oneness that exists in All That Is. Many of his lyrics, during and after the Beatle era, reflect some of that understanding, although his life - and death - was one of dualistic turmoil.

Reading Greenberg's book and other chronicles of John Lennon's life reveals a human being with a great deal of unresolved pain and anger and fear, a history of brilliance and incredible accomplishments combined with great sadness, violence, jealousy and substance abuse. By choosing a lifetime in which he would be so monumentally famous, and die so infamously, you might say that John "volunteered" to play out the dualistic drama for us in his physical and emotional life, even as he sang about the true nature of our oneness and the synchronicity of everything that occurs:

"Nowhere you can be that isn't where you're meant to be."

Nothing truly, irrevocably tragic occurs, folks. We desire as souls to experience everything that we can conceive of, to know everything there is to know. In this "experiment" - three-dimensional physical reality in a linear time continuum - we are exploring how love, the essence of All That Is, can be expressed. It is intense. And perhaps, we are almost done with this particular experiment, which may be why so many feel ready to move on from the experience of separateness.

Maybe that's what John was asking us to imagine - no Heaven, no hell, no religion, no country, no possessions... in other words, a world without duality.

"All you need is love."
 

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