CRAVING OYSTERS? ANCHOVIES? MORE ON: "THE TRUTH ABOUT EVERYTHING, PART FIVE: THE BODY NEVER LIES!"

Part Five from the "Truth About Everything" series - "THE BODY NEVER LIES!" - starts with this:

First coined in mass consciousness, as far as I know, by Alexander Lowen, creator of the mind-body-emotions therapy process known as Bioenergetics, this simple, direct statement - "The body never lies" - should change everything in the same way that the other Truths About Everything should. What Lowen extensively demonstrated in several seminal books, including, Language of the Body, was that our physical bodies "speak" openly and clearly, continuously and unequivocally to us and to others. If you want to know the state of a person's inner life, beliefs and attitudes, even their emotional, physical and psychological history, you can literally read their body language like a book.

Well, there is another way that the body never lies, and that is through its genuine cravings for whatever it needs in the way of nourishment and physical support. Now, I emphasize the word "genuine" for a reason. Many of our so-called cravings do not initiate with the body, but rather in the mind, and more specifically, in the ego.

Here's the way that works - if a human being is chronically sad, for instance, which means that there is stockpiled sadness caused by unreleased grief from childhood being held in the body, the ego will take the need for emotional comfort, for getting some "sweetness" out of life, and seek a substitute fast fix solution for the problem. One such very common fix, readily available in our culture for the above reason, is... sugar! Yeah, sugar, and in large and then larger doses, too!



You see, the problem is, whenever any kind of food, substance (drugs, alcohol) or activity (work, sex) is employed as a substitute for an emotional need, addiction ultimately results because the external thing isn't meeting the true need, so more and more of the thing is sought after. ("Just one more cupcake, shot, bump or hump and I'll be nice, right?" Nope.)

Okay, back to the point of this post. The body is essentially a receiver and a messenger. It receives information from the various organs and systems that comprise our physical selves about what is currently needed for optimum health, and it transmits that information through cravings and intuitions to the mind, ideally bypassing the ego. (See the FPL post "FULL PERMISSION EATING" for more details.)

In other words, if you have done the self-work necessary to be in touch with your emotions, and therefore with your body, you can trust your desires, and you will not be prone to excess over time... once you get used to the freedom! And you won't need to rely on medical doctors or nutritionists or books to tell you what you need. You'll sense it, feel it.

So, recently, I started having a craving for oysters and anchovies and broccolini, finding their tastes and textures irresistible. That was the craving part. And I trusted it. I even found a guy in a fish market who would shuck the oysters for me... after a few attempts to do it myself, resulting in a couple of nice holes in the palm of my hand!


Simultaneously, I noticed I'd been getting a lot of muscle cramps at night, recently, and that I wasn't sleeping well, either. That's where the intuition part came in. I put the cravings and the cramps and the erratic sleeping pattern together, and what did I get?

Calcium!

My body needed more calcium. Calcium deficiency was causing those classic symptoms of same, and it "turned out" that the foods I was craving were all good sources of calcium.

The body never lies!

                                         
Bon appetit!!



TODAY'S QUOTE!

There is no such thing as the unknown, only the temporarily hidden.

REPOST: STOP TRYING SO HARD!

Okay, check this out. THIS is a link to a piece and a video of a 5 YEAR OLD BOY, Ariel Antigua, who can hit a major league fastball and field like a professional. He was featured on the cover of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED a while ago.

Think about it. Five! As in... years old!

In linear terms, no child of that age, so close to having been in diapers and fairly recently learned how to walk, can learn or develop through practice the ability to consistently hit a baseball coming at him at 85 miles an hour. The few grown ups who are able to do that are paid millions of dollars because the talent is so unique.

So, what does this tell us?

Whenever a child demonstrates these kinds of gifts - from Mozart (made his debut at 6 years old) to Bobby Fischer (U.S. chess champ at 14) to Wayne Gretzky (who was skating with 10-year-olds at the age of six) - we are amazed, and consider it an anomaly. But what if the presence of these kids among us is a message to all of us, one that is in fact relevant to all of us?

What if we all have a great gift inside of us waiting not to be developed by intense practice or hard work, but rather waiting simply to be channeled through us?

Children are naturally open channels to the spirit, and so through a child can come the magnificent expressions of our true nature. Unfortunately, parents and teachers and society at large do their unconscious best to try and close those channels in early childhood by forcing children to "work" instead of play, to sit still instead of move, to memorize facts instead of explore the world around them. And even worse than being forced to follow such spirit-crushing dictates, kids are forced to feed the hungry egos of said parents, teachers and society.

Okay, well, that damage done, you are an adult, now. You are your own parent, in a very real sense. That's great news! You can consciously reconnect to your soul, and the best way to do it is through the spirit of play, which is the way the soul does its "work."

Yes. Stop trying so hard to be someone or to be "good" at something, folks. You're already great! You already have amazing gifts to bring to this life, to this planet, to us all. If you stopped "working" at it, and started playing at it, you'd be laughing your way to the bank... or the major leagues!

Come on... let's play!

YOU ARE NOT VULNERABLE WHEN YOU'RE OPEN. YOU'RE VULNERABLE WHEN YOU'RE LITTLE!

I read an blog post a while ago entitled, "The One Quality We Often Mistake For Weakness Can Actually Make You Stronger," which extolls the virtues of being "vulnerable." Citing examples from President Obama to the Dalai Lama, the piece gives examples of the strength that comes from being vulnerable. The post refers to a book, "Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead," by Brene Brown.

While I essentially support what the post and book are trying to say, the language of the authors demonstrates a very common error which I would like to address here.

"I feel too vulnerable when..."

How often I hear individuals begin a sentence like that. Usually, the person in question who is perceiving themselves as "vulnerable" is talking about being "open" in some situation that is revealing of their inner life to another. But this common connection in one's mind between openness and vulnerability is erroneous. 

You are not vulnerable when you're open.

The definition of "vulnerable" in most dictionaries is: "susceptible to physical or emotional harm." Okay. That's pretty straightforward. So, when are we the most susceptible to harm in those ways? Well, in two situations, mainly: 1. when we are without an option for avoiding danger; and 2. when we are truly dependent on another person or persons who may choose to do us harm. And when are we most likely to be in such situations? Well, unless you are literally a hostage in a terrorist takeover, or a prisoner of war or in jail, the most prevalent time human beings are actually vulnerable to harm is - you guessed it - in childhood!

That's right. In childhood, especially early childhood, we are essentially hostages to our parents and caretakers, without options to avoid the slings and arrows of our environment. And we are utterly and completely dependent on those others for our well-being, even for our very existence. Whatever the vicissitudes of our parents' mental and emotional health, or lack thereof, we, as children, cannot protect ourselves or remove ourselves from harm's way. We can't stop adults from hurting us, nor can we trade in one set of adults for another. In other words... we are vulnerable. Truly.

Now, here's where the confusion comes in and how the erroneous connection gets made.

As children, as newly minted human beings, we are naturally open, physically, mentally and emotionally. We feel everything fully when we're first born, and to some degree, we stay that way throughout the very early years of life. However, because of the undeveloped, un-self-actualized aspects of humanity, we are injured by our environment. Our parents and caretakers hurt us. Yet, we cannot stop them, nor can we leave them.

So what do we do? We begin to shut down, distort, and/or disconnect parts of ourselves physically, mentally and emotionally in order not to feel the pain so acutely. We form a character structure, and initially, it actually does seem to mitigate the pain, which seems to validate the conclusion that open is vulnerable, and closed is safe.

See, we can't understand truly when we're little that we're little. We can't really picture that one day, we'll be adults ourselves, and have the choices adults have. In other words, we can't understand that it's being little that makes us vulnerable, not being open that makes us vulnerable. And so, stuck in the confines of our character structures as time passes, we miss the fact that nature provides the solution to the problem of vulnerability in childhood - we grow up!

In adulthood, we can realize that protecting ourselves emotionally with the armor of character defenses is very inefficient and inhibiting, and most importantly, no longer necessary. Wearing that suit of armor doesn't make for the easy enjoyment of a sunny day, let alone for making love. On the other hand, being fully open to our inner lives, which frees up the mind and body, gives us the energy and flexibility to creatively express ourselves, enjoy life and, if need be, avoid situations that would do us harm, which mainly means not engaging with negativity. Thus, in this realization, we can engage in a healing process, in an holistic self-work process, that can dismantle the armor and allow us to be ourselves fully.

So, let go of the false belief that when you love and reveal yourself to another, you are vulnerable. And Brene, forgive me for suggesting a slight change to the title of your book, but "Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be OPEN Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead" would work better for me.

STILL MORE ON: BEANS, NAPS, BOOZE, SEX and IKIGAI!

Here we go again! Another in the series...

Emma Morano, the world’s oldest person at 117, died at her home in northern Italy on Saturday afternoon. Morano’s doctor confirmed the news to the Associated Press, saying Morano’s caretaker informed him she had died peacefully while sitting in an armchair at her home in Verbania. Morano was also believed to be the last person alive who was born in the 1800s, with a birthday in November 1899. Morano, who outlived all eight of her siblings, had attributed her long life to a diet of three eggs a day, two of them raw, the BBC reported. She survived two World Wars, more than 90 Italian governments and a tough personal life, with the loss of her only son at six months old and an abusive marriage.

So, why do we do it? What makes it all worthwhile?


In the American remake of the movie "City Of Angels," Nicolas Cage's character, an angel, asks Dennis Franz' character, an angel who incarnated as a human being, why he did it, didn't he miss being able to hear the sunrise over the ocean the way he could in angelic form? Franz says "Yes, I do miss it sometimes, but... I can do this!" as he strips off his clothes and runs naked into the ocean.

So, it's time for a check-in, an update on your "Ikigai,"the Japanese concept meaning “a reason for being,” or as they think of it on Okinawa, “a reason to get up in the morning.” What does it for you? Love, Eros and Sex? Fine food? Music? Painting? Cooking? Playing tennis? Building a house? Watching the final episode of "Mad Men?" (I'm really glad I was here for that!)

Whatever it is that gets you up in the morning, folks, appreciate it. Remind yourself to indulge whatever your greatest pleasures and preferences are. It's why you're here... and there's nowhere else like here!




Below are two previous posts that ran under the heading on FPL:

"MORE ON: 'BEANS, NAPS, BOOZE, SEX and IKIGAI - ARE YOU IN THE BLUE ZONE? (OH, AND PASS THE BACON!)"

Okay, here's the headline: Susannah Mushatt Jones, World's Oldest Person, Eats Bacon Every Day!

Susannah Mushatt Jones turned 116 over the summer and is the oldest person in the world.

So what's her secret? It just might be plenty of bacon. Jones has bacon, eggs and grits for breakfast every morning.

Along with a daily dose of bacon, Jones spends plenty of time snoozing. Her niece, Lois Judge, told The Huffington Post in June that she sleeps about 10 hours a night and also takes regular naps.

And what about Ikigai? "I surround myself with love and positive energy. That’s the key to long life and happiness."

Jones, who was born in Alabama on July 6, 1899, is one of only two known living people who were alive in the 19th century.



[NOTE: Jones is not alone among centenarians in her love for bacon. Pearl Cantrell, who died in 2013 at the age of 105, enjoyed bacon so much that Oscar Meyer sent one of its Wienermobiles to her home to deliver some. Cantrell: "I love bacon. I eat it everyday."]




Here's the earlier post on longevity and Ikigai -

Saw a very interesting interview the other night on Bill Maher with author, Dan Buettner, who wrote the bestseller, “The Blue Zones.” What are the Blue Zones? They are 5 places in the world – from Okinawa, Japan to Loma Linda, California – where people regularly live to 100 years old. (The other 3 Blue Zones are Sardinia in Italy, Ikaria in Greece, and Nicoya in Costa Rica)

Buettner found that: "Blue Zone centenarians have somehow managed to avoid the chronic diseases – heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes – that kill the majority of people in industrialized countries around the world, and especially, in the United States.” 

Buettner sought to discover what the people in these 5 places had in common.

You ready? Here it is – every population group had beans as a regular part of their diet, took daily naps, had 2 or 3 drinks of alcohol per day, walked a lot (but no gym) and had sex at least twice a week!

Beans, naps, booze and sex!

Oh, and one more thing, perhaps the most important – they all had “ikigai,” along with some kind of spiritual practice. What is ikigai? It is a Japanese concept meaning “a reason for being,” or as they think of it on Okinawa, “a reason to get up in the morning.”

"Everyone," according to the Japanese, "has an ikigai. Finding it requires a deep and often lengthy search of self."

In a TED Talk, Dan Buettner referenced ikigai as one of the reasons people in the area had such long lives. This ties in with the entire concept of Full Permission Living, of course, and with many posts on FPL, including the recent quote from Lee Carroll channeling "Kryon," that asks the question: "What did you come here for?"

So, folks, find your ikigai. You have one. You do. And the great secret to finding it through your dedicated self-work is this: as much as possible, do what you feel passionate about doing in every moment.

And don't forget the bourbon and beans!

 

blogger templates 3 columns | Make Money Online